SCW97 On To Valencia

El Grao de Castellón, Spain, June 14, 1938.
As Nationalist armies swung south in their Aragón offensive, seeking to widen their corridor to the sea, the green divisions opposing them, unaffected by the collapse of the divisions farther north, were putting up a stiff fight.

Aftermath: After several days of fighting in the suburbs, the Nationalists were finally able to take the town and with it its excellent port facilities in the Mediterannean. South of the Nationalist forces, lay the Republican seat of goverment, Valencia, beckoning from only fifty miles away.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist:

Republican:

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 682.


SCW98 XYZ

Viver, Spain, July 15, 1938.
After having swept the Republican armies off the field in their Aragón Offensive and having cut the Republic in two, the Nationalists decided to culminate their victories by capturing Valencia, the seat of the Republican government. Opposing them were only untried Republican divisions and after having beaten the best the Republic had to offer, this new attack would pose no problems.

Aftermath: The Italian CTV and Galician Army Corps opened their offensive as had been expected, with a rapid advance that progressed sixty miles before coming upon a prepared Republican defensive system called the XYZ Line. There the attack was blunted with rude abruptness and repeated attempts to breach the line were unsucessful, even with the employment of over 1000 field guns. Hurling thousands of men against a system of reinforced trenches with interlocking fields of fire and preplotted artillery resulted in slaughter for the attacking Spanish and Italians. As the fighting ended on July 25th, the Nationalists had lost almost 20,000 men to only 5000 Republicans.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: artillery. (no air support), Elements of the 5. a División de Navarra, requetés (4-5-7's).

Republican: Field phones, artillery, machine guns, interlocking trenches.

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Antony Beevor, pp. 233-234.
2. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 685.
3. Legions of Babel, Verle Johnston, p. 134.


SCW99 Sons of Negrin

Fayón, Spain, July 24, 1938.
The Republicans, seeking to prolong the war until a general European conflict should come to their aid, launched their Ebro offensive on the night of July 24th. As commandos swam the Ebro river to kill the sentries and fix ropes on the opposite shore, Republican forces of the XVth and Vth Army Corps crossed over in boats and on pontoon bridges, while the 42nd Division crossed to the north. The surprised Moroccans of the 50th Division on the other side soon found themselves cut off by large numbers of Republican troops.

Aftermath: The 50th, shattered by the attack, retreated as best it could, leaving 4000 prisoners with the Republicans who were advancing rapidly as dawn approached. The Nationalist Corp commander, General Yagüe barely excaped capture himself. In the first phase of the offensive, the Nationalists had been utterly routed.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the 50. a División.

Republicans: Elements of the 42. a División, machine guns, mortar, artillery.
Elements of the Commando Force, XIVth Corps (14. o Cuerpo).

Terrain:

SSR:
1. Night rules are in affect.

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Antony Beevor, p. 237.
2. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 689.

Republic's forces for the offensive were 80,000 men, each division with 10,000 men (in theory), 5000 rifles, 255 machine guns, 30 mortars, four anti-tank guns, three artillery groups of nine field guns, and a batalion of engineers.


SCW100 Les Braves Gens

Amposta, Spain, July 25, 1938.
Intending to widen their intended breakthkrough along the Ebro, Republican commanders had launched a secondary offensive across the river at Amposta, led by the French XIVth International Brigade. Crossing by pontoon boats, the French overwhelmed the Nationalist sentries and began landing supplies.

Aftermath: Counterattacking, the Nationalist 105th Division engaged the French in bitter fighting in which the Internationals took the worst. Finally, after eighteen hours of slaughter, the French withdrew, leaving over 600 dead and scores of materiel and equipment. The breach at Amposta had failed, but farther north the Republicans were pouring across in a huge break in the Nationalist lines.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the 105. a División.

Republican: Elements of the French XIV. a Brigada Internacional.

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, ed. James Cortada, p. 176.
2. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 689.
3. The Spanish Civil War, Antony Beevor, p. 237


SCW101 The Pimple

Gandesa, Spain, August 1, 1938.
As the Republicans participating in the Ebro offensive advanced, they came upon a hasty defensive line manned by the Nationalist 13th Division which had forced marched through the night. The 13th had taken up positions astride the Republican advance on top of a prominence directly in front of Gandesa known as Hill 481. To the men of the XVth International, it was known as "the Pimple.". Every assault upon the hill was beaten back with heavy losses. On August 1st, massing half the Republican artillery and bringing in armoured units, the Republicans tried again.

Aftermath: Determined to take Gandesa, the Spanish and English assaulted the hill several times, each time beaten back with heavy losses. Finally, realizing that their offensive was over, the Republicans began to dig in as best they could in the stony ground. The inevitable Nationalist counterattack was on the way.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the 13. a División, (sangars?).

Republican: Elements of the Spano-British Battalion, XV. a Brigada Internacional, 35. a División, (4-4-7's, , 3-3-6's), tanks, artillery, machine guns, mortars.

Terrain: stoney ground, hill, dry heat.

SSR: very difficult to entrench. Troops built sangars instead.

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 690.

The International Brigades had taken such high losses that, because of replacements, they were 70-75% Spanish, including many conscripts of teenagers, convicts, etc.


SCW102 Counterthrust

August 6, 1938.
First major Nationalist Counterattack.

Aftermath: The northern Republican salient was reduced with the loss of 900 dead, 2000 prisoners and much materiel for the Republicans. The old front line had been established between Mequinenza and Fayón.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the 82. a División, two tank companies and air cover.

Republican: Elements of the 15. o Cuerpo, machine guns.

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, ed. James Cortada, p. 177.
2..The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 691.


SCW103 Stand Or Die

Sierra de Pandols, August 11, 1938.
On the southern wing of the front, the Nationalists launched a new counterattack to try and reduce the Republican salient.

Aftermath: After much bitter fighting and high casualties from counterattacking Republicans, the Nationalists found that they could gain little ground. The Republicans had been ordered to hold or be shot.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the (?) 4. a División de Navarra, requetés (4-5-7's)

Republicans: Elements of the 4. o Cuerpo.

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, ed. James Cortada, p. 177.
2. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 691.


SCW104 Hill 666

Gandesa Spain, Auguest 19, 1938.
After having relieved the Spanish 11th Division five days before, the Spanish-American Lincoln Battalion had held a promintory known as hill 666 against repeated Nationalist attacks. Dead Republicans, Moroccans and Legionaires littered the ground, filling the air with the putresence of their unburied bodies. With the ground too stoney for foxholes, the troops had to pile rocks as shelters against bullets. Pounded every day by artillery and aircraft, the Republicans had orders to hold or be shot. On the 19th, the barrage started as usual, but when it did not lift, the Spanish and Americans of the XVth knew they were in for it.

Aftermath: After being pounded by artillery for eight hours, the barrage lifted and the surviving Lincolns found themselves under attack by Moroccan regulares. Men broke but were rallied and the attack was beaten off with hand grenades. Like everywhere on the line, the Republicans were taking enormous punishment but holding out, barely. The Spanish and American Lincolns held for twelve days before being relieved by the British. Of 200 men that had crossed the Ebro, only 52 were left.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: regulares (4-5-8), artillery.

Republican: Elements of the Spanish-American Lincoln Battalion, XV. a Brigada Internacional (4-4-7's, 3-4-7's, 3-3-6's), machine guns, commisar, sangars.

Terrain: stoney ground, dry heat.

SSR:
1. Entrenchment very difficult.

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Passionate War, Peter Wyden, pp. 481-483.


SCW105 Holdout At Gandessa

Corbera, Spain, September 3, 1938.
A combined offensive of the Nationalist Army of the Maestrazgo and Yagüe's Corps Marroquí was launched to relieve pressure on Gandessa.

Aftermath: The Nationalists were able to capture considerable territory from the Republicans, but again only in the face of fanatical resistence.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the 1. a División de Navarra.

Republican:

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 693-694.
2. Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, ed. James Cortada, pp. 82-83.


SCW106 Viva La Legión!

22 September, 1938.
"During the Ebro offensive, Lt. Berghesse de Borbón led the 11th Company, 4th Bandera, in an attack upon enemy trenches. Wounded in the leg, the lieutenant nonetheless leapt into a machine gun post and killed the gunner and two servers single-handed. He then used their machine gun to give covering fire for his advancing platoons. The Republicans, stronly reinforced, now fiercely counter-attacked. Lt. Borghesse de Borbón threw grenade after grenade at the oncoming waves of enemy, and despatched attackers who got too close with his pistol. Then a grenade exploded at his feet, wounding him in the chest; but he continued to fight on, rousing his men with cries of `Viva España! Viva la Legión!' until he finally died."


Notes:

1. The Spanish Foreign Legion, John Scurr, p. 35.


SCW107 Nail In The Coffin

Sierra de Pandols, Spain, October 30, 1938.
Frustrated by stiff resistence in the Pandols mountains, the Nationalists geared for another major effort to drive the Republicans from the range.

Aftermath: After four days of fighting, the Nationalists were able to break through the Republican lines and take the town of Pinell by November 3rd. With Republican troops falling back on all fronts, the Battle of the Ebro was nearing its end.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist:

Republican:

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, ed. James Cortada, p. 177.


SCW108 Advance The Victors

Mora la Nueva, Spain, November 7, 1938.
After months of fruitless attacks, the Nationalists had broken the Republican lines and thrown the enemy back in a series of offensives. In a flanking maneuver, the Nationalists attacked the retreating Republicans at the riverside town of Mora la Nueva.

Aftermath: Battered and weary, the Republicans retreated at all points. With the weight of their armour, the Nationalists took the town and began the process of reducing the fortefied position of Mount Picosa. With its fall, Republican forces retreated across the river, abandoning the field to the victorious Nationalists by November 18th.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist:

Republican:

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, pp. 703-704.


SCW109 Tremp Card

Tremp, Spain, December 23, 1938.
With the end of the war in sight, the Nationalist offensive to conquer Catalonia began on December 23rd. At all points, the Nationalist advance was swift with Republicans putting up only token resistence, if at all. However, as the Nationalists crossed the Flamisell river before the Pyrenees mountains, they found the Republican 26th Division, the old anarchists of Durruti's column who were not yet beaten.

Aftermath: The Nationalist advance progressed only in the face of stiff opposition and in all, only a small amount of ground was gained. The stubborn stand of the 26th held the Republican flank and prevented a total collapse. It also bought time for thousands of refugees to continue on their flight into France before the Nationalist proscriptions that would begin.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Elements of the Cuerpo Urgel and Cuerpo Maestrazgo, 13. a Bandera of the Spanish Foreign Legion, supported by 9. o Tabor de Melilla firing machine guns from across the river, massive artillery support.

Republican: Elements of the 26. a División.

Terrain:

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Antony Beevor, p. 248.
2. The Spanish Foreign Legion, John Scurr, p. 35.


SCW110 Granadella Grapple

Granadella, Spain, December 25, 1938.
As the realization that the new Nationalist offensive meant the conquest of Catalonia, the 11th Division was once again thrown into combat to try and halt the advance. At Granadella, they met the Nationalist advance on Christmas Day in a last effort to save Catalonia.

Aftermath: Aided partly by high floodwaters that brought up the level of the Ebro and prevented much Nationalist supply from crossing, the Republicans were able to hold the advance for two weeks before giving way. But the end was coming. Catalonia had less than two months of freedom before it.


Suggestion of Forces:

Nationalist: Yagüe?

Republican: Elements of the 11. a División.

Terrain: Hills.

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Antony Beevor, p. 248.
2. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 716.


SCW111 The Last Dance

Borjas Blancas, Spain, January 4, 1939.
The Italians, advancing with a speed and aggressiveness that was surprising to the Spanish on both sides, attacked the Republican lines at Borjas Blancas while the Nationalist Spanish protected their flanks. Standing in their way was the old 11th Division, ready to put up one last fight.

Aftermath: As the Nationalist committed more troops to the offensive, the stand by the Republican 11th finally cracked, unable to bear the wight of the Italian armour. With Republican forces unable to seal the breach, the front lay open. Catalonia was doomed and Madrid itself would fall in only three more months to a leisurely Nationalist Advance. The Rebels had won their war and the Republic was dead.


Suggestion of Forces:

Italian: Fiat-ansaldos.

Republican: 11. a División.

Terrain: Hills.

SSR:

Victory Condtions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Antony Beevor, p. 248.
2. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, p. 716.


SCW112 Once Brothers

Madrid, Spain, March 9, 1939.
After the commander of the Republican Army of the Center, Colonel Casado, supplanted the goverment in a coup designed to end the war, the three communist corps stationed outside the city moved in on March 7th and began to take over operations. The communists intended to continue the war hoping that a general European conflict would come to their rescue. Casado's forces retreated to the southeastern section of the city, engaging the communists in heavy fighting. At the point where the communists were on the point of victory, Cipriano Mera's anarchist 4th Army Corps declared support for the coup marched to the city, capturing Alcala and Terrejón enroute. As anarchist units entered the city on the 8th, heavy fighting ensued for posession of the Capital.

Aftermath: As Mera's forces captured the Army Corps headquarters, Casado's men advanced also. Fighting continued until the 12th when communist units were ordered back to their positions and certain of their leaders were executed. Advancing Nationalist troops attempting to take advantage of this new civil war were cut down in the Casa de Campo. Negotiations by the coup leaders failed and as Republican leaders fled the country, Republican troops laid down their arms to the advanceing Nationalists who embraced them as brothers. The war officialy ended on March 31st but the roundup, imprisonment and execution of those who had supported the Republic had only just begun.


Suggestion of Forces:

Anarchist: Elements of the 12. a División, 4. o Cuerpo.

Communist: Elements of the 8. a División.

Terrain: urban

SSR:

Victory Conditions:


Notes:

1. The Spanish Civil War, Hugh Thomas, pp.745-749

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